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What happens if you are convicted of a felony in Connecticut?

Felonies are serious business. Like most states, Connecticut has different classifications and penalties for felonies based on the severity of the crime. Classifications range from the severest, which is considered a capital felony and then from Class A through Class D, with Class D being the least severe. Penalties for a guilty conviction for felonies is as follows:

Capital felonies: A capital felony conviction carries a punishment of death by execution or life in prison without any chance of parole.

Class A: Class A felony convictions carry a punishment of a minimum sentence of 10 to 25 years in prison and a possible fine of $20,000.

Class B: Class B felony convictions carry a punishment of a minimum sentence of 1 to 25 years in prison, and a possible fine of $15,000.

Class C: Class C felony convictions carry a punishment of a minimum sentence of 1 to 10 years in prison and a possible fine of $10,000.

Class D: Class D felony convictions carry a punishment of a minimum sentence of 1 to 5 years in prison and a possible fine of $5,000.

No one wants to be charged with a felony, let alone convicted of one. When you have a felony conviction on your record, it can affect your entire life, even if you have served your sentence and paid your penalties. The job market is one way a felony conviction affects your life.

Many jobs or professions require background checks where your felony conviction will be revealed. Jobs that don't require background checks usually require you to answer a question when applying as to whether you have ever been convicted of a felony.

If you are charged with a felony, it is important to have an attorney who is understanding and able to put together a good defense for your case. The lower the charges can be dropped, the better the outcome. In the case of a conviction, your attorney may also work with you to see if erasing or pardoning your record is an option.

Source: State Laws, "Connecticut Felony," accessed Nov. 23, 2016

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